~ Red Lion Inns

[TAVERNS AND HOTELS]

The Red Lion Inn

QUAKERTOWN

The original stone building was erected by Enoch Roberts. The Red Lion Inn, built around 1750, was a popular stop for stagecoaches en route from Philadelphia to the Lehigh Valley.


Early Taverns of Bucks county, 1965 - Willis M. Rivinus

McCoole's Tavern
The first tavern built in Quakertown, at the corner of what is now Broad and Main streets, was opened in 1750 under the direction of Walter McCoole. In this period the first German people were arriving to fulfill their hopes of bountiful harvests in an atmosphere of religious independence. The old tavern on the road to Bethlehem was later renamed and became famous as the Red Lion Inn.
 
The proprietor of McCoole's Tavern (Abel Robert's Tavern, currently, the Red Lion Hotel) extends full support, Polk's horses are cared for and fed as the Cavalry bivouacs for the night, before continuing the journey. Seven days later, on September 24th, the long and arduous trip from Philadelphia to Allentown ends. The Bell is safely hidden in the basement of Zion Reformed Church , where it is to stay until the end of the Revolution.
http://www.jamesmannartfarm.com/libbell
Today the Red Lion Inn is open as McCooles at the Red Lion Inn.
4 S Main St
Quakertown, PA 18951
Phone: (215) 538-1776
Fax: (215) 538-1738

 

CASPAR HINKLE, proprietor of the Red Lion hotel, P.O. Quakertown, was born August, 1827, in Plumstead township, Bucks county, and is the oldest living male representative of the family. His ancestors came to this county over two hundred years ago and settled in Plumstead township, and have since been represented in the county and take rank among its substantial and respected citizens. The father of our subject was Anthony Hinkle, whose wife was Sallie Meitzler, to whom seven children were born: Caspar, Eliza, Maria, Caroline, Sarah, Amanda and Francis. Caspar removed with his parents to Berks county when eleven years of age, remaining there two years, when they removed to Lehigh county, where Caspar was reared to farming pursuits. He remained under the parental roof until he was 23 years of age, when he engaged in farming on his own account until the death of his father in 1870, when he sold his property in Lehigh county and came to Quakertown. He took charge of the well-known Red Lion hotel which he had previously purchased in 1875 of Peter Smith, and which he has successfully conducted until the present time. His wife was the daughter of Benjamin Smoyer, of Lehigh county. They have had four children: Theodore, Oscar, Emma and George. Oscar died, aged 23, and George at the age of 18. Emma was married in December, 1886, to Lewis Schotts, of Bingen. Theodore is engaged in business with his father in the hotel. He married Amanda, daughter of Solomon Wenner, and has two children: Lena O. and George O.

 Battle's History of Bucks County

page 942

 

From, Quakertown Free Press, Deaths

Apr. 18, 1902  James K. Stoneback, proprietor of the Red Lion Hotel, died of heart failure aged 51 years. 50

 

WILLOW GROVE

E. Buck purchased the Red Lion Inn which stood near the intersection of Easton and York Roads
  1. HISTORY BOOK

BENSALEM

Matthias Fenton, son of Joseph and Mary, married at the Dutch Reformed Church of North and Southampton, August 23, 1770, Rachel Harding, daughter of John Thomas Harding, of Northampton. They purchased the famous old Red Lion Inn, in Bensalem in 1779
The Red Lion (3) tavern, in Bensalem, is one of the oldest in the lower part of the county. In 1730 Philip Amos petitioned the court to keep a public house of entertainment "near Poquessing creek, on the highway from Philadelphia to Bristol This became the Red Lion.
CHAPTER XXIII, 1905 Edition OLD TAVERNS, DAVIS History of Bucks County
  1. DEMOLITION OF THE RED LION

NEWTOWN BUCKS COUNTY

They held meetings here till the morning of April 6th,
when they adjourned to meet at the inn of Amos Strickland, in
Newtown-then called the Red Lion Inn.

In I760 all that was left of the name and estate of Walley in
Newtown, was the Red Lion Inn and half an acre of land, sold
by the sheriff as the property of Joseph WValley, saddler."Red Lion," which name was a general favorite among Englishmen,
by reason of its being a prominent figure- on the British
coat-of-arms.BRICK HOTEL, NEWTOWN, PA.
Built in 1764 by Amos Strickland on site of Red Lion inn. The third story, also the
brick addition on west end built about 1837, by Capt. Joseph Archambault, a page of
Napoleon's. Continental soldiers and Hessian officers quartered here after the battle of
Trenton.

Papers Read before the BCHS -

TORRESDALE

Mr. Purdy took over the Red Lion Inn, Torresdale,

STOCKBRIDGE MASSACHUSETTS
http://www.redlioninn.com/rli/history.html

In continuous use since the 18th century. As immortalized in Norman Rockwell's painting Main Street, Stockbridge, the Inn epitomizes New England tradition.
Some time around 1773, Anna and Silas Bingham established a general store in Stockbridge on the road that connected Boston to Albany, which soon evolved as a stagecoach stop, tavern and Inn, under the sign of the red lion.

Red Lion Hotel now the Red Lion Inn in Red Lion, New Jersey

It is said that it was built in 1710
Previous owners: Job BISHOP or John BISHOP.Hannah Joyce and her husband, Job Bishop (but could be listed as John Bishop) owned the Red Lion Tavern in 1813, and three years later sold it to Hannah's brother, Eayre, (Err) Joyce. Job Bishop was born July 31, 1785 in Vincentown, NJ and died March 26, 1845 in Lumberton, NJ.
Southampton NJ

ELIZABETH Four miles from Newark.
The Borough of Elizabeth was incorporated February 8, 1739

Site of Red Lion Inn. Broad Street and Rahway Avenue. Now occupied by Public Library. Inn built about 1734. In 1764, called Marquis of Granby. In 1771 name changed to "Red Lion." General Washington on the way to his first inauguration stopped and held a reception at the Red Lion.

Red Lion Inn Little Compton

Donnington Country, the centre of the Cotswolds, with easy access to Cheltenham, Gloucester, Oxford and Stratford-upon-Avon (Shakespeare's birth place).

Page last updated: July 24, 2011

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